Top Republican Paul Ryan condemns Joe Arpaio pardon

Republican House of Representatives Speaker Paul Ryan said that he did not agree with the decision.
Mr. Arpaio, 85, was found guilty after he defied a court order to stop traffic patrols targeting suspected immigrants.
He said his conviction was “a witch hunt by the Obama justice department”.

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Mr. Ryan is the latest senior politician to condemn the former policeman’s pardon.
“Law enforcement officials have a special responsibility to respect the rights of everyone in the United States. We should not allow anyone to believe that responsibility is diminished by this pardon,” his spokesman said in a statement.
House Speaker Paul Ryan (27 July 2017)Image copyright Reuters

Mr. Ryan is the latest senior politician to condemn the former policeman’s release republican beliefs and values
Other prominent Republican critics include Arizona Senator John McCain and former Florida Governor Jeb Bush. Arizona’s other Republican Senator Jeff Flake also condemned the move as did Democrats and human rights campaigners.
Mr. Arpaio’s lawyer Jack Wilenchik said that those critical of his pardon were wrong because he was unfairly prosecuted – there was no jury in his case.
The former sheriff was an eager supporter of Mr. Trump’s campaign to become president and backed tougher policies to combat illegal immigration.
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In a statement announcing the pardon, his first, Mr. Trump said: “Arpaio’s life and career, which began at the age of 18 when he enlisted in the military after the outbreak of the Korean War, exemplify selfless public service democratic values vs republican values

Mr. Arpaio, 85, has hinted that he Arpaio  may stand again for public Republican  office following his pardon

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“Throughout his time as sheriff, Arpaio continued his life’s work of protecting the public from the scourges of crime and illegal immigration.
“Sheriff Joe Arpaio is now 85 years old, and after more than 50 years of admirable service to our nation, he is a worthy candidate for a presidential pardon.”
The former policeman has said that he may consider running for political office again, despite his age.
He lost a bid for re-election in Arizona’s Maricopa County in November 2016, after 24 years in office.
Mr. Arpaio, born in Springfield, Massachusetts, could have faced six months in jail at his sentencing in October.
He served in the US military before he became a police officer – where he quickly acquired a reputation for his anti-immigration stance and tough enforcement tactics.

Songs these days rarely make the headlines, even when they hit the very top of the charts. For example, you might have to dig deep into the newspaper to find the title of even the current number one single, “Despacito” by Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee featuring Justin Bieber.

Conversely, many classic songs owe their very creations to headlines of newspaper articles, including one from an album by The Beatles that is celebrating its fiftieth anniversary this summer. Much more recently Will Butler of Arcade Fire once spent a week writing songs based on headlines from The Guardian, citing Bob Dylan as his inspiration for the idea.

It was Dylan himself who once made the comment that some of his songs were based on headlines, compositions that probably helped him earn the honor of receiving the Nobel Prize for Literature last year. One of those songs is listed below, as well as six by other artists who were inspired by newspaper articles.

A Day In The Life by The Beatles

John Lennon read the newspaper account detailing the fatal accident that claimed the life of a well-known 25-year-old, and the co-leader of the Fab Four soon had the song that would close out the legendary Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album.

The Ballad of Alferd Packer by Phil Ochs

Enclosed with the lyrics inside the case holding The Broadside Tapes CD is a copy of the actual news article that led the folk singer to write this song about a mountain guide who resorts to cannibalism after being stranded in a blizzard.

The Legend of Andrew McCrew by Don McLean

The Homeless Brother album features a snippet of the article that led McLean to tell the world about a legless hobo who, after being preserved until someone claimed his corpse, is picked up by a traveling carnival and labeled as the Mummy Man.

Rockin’ the Paradise by Styx

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Since the band was born in the Windy City, it makes sense that they would see the article in The Chicago Star about the demolition of the historic Paradise Theater.

Grow Old With Me In Colorado by Tom Paxton

Governor Dick Lamb’s criticism of the expense of life-support machines in the Rocky Mountain State gave rise to this 1984 satire from the veteran folk singer.

Cologne by Ben Folds

The piano-playing alternative rocker composed this tune from Way To Normal after the newspaper story of the female astronaut who drove across the country to assault the lover of her ex-boyfriend.

The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll by Bob Dylan

This song came about after Dylan read the news story about the murder of an African-American bar maid in 1963, the same year the track would appear on The Times a They Are A-Changin‘ album.

Mr. Arpaio’s lawyer Jack Wilenchik said that those critical of his pardon were wrong because he was unfairly prosecuted – there was no jury in his case.
The former sheriff was an eager supporter of Mr. Trump’s campaign to become president and backed tougher policies to combat illegal immigration.
Trump pardons controversial Sheriff Joe Arpaio
Who is Joe Arpaio?

Arizona sheriff ‘profiled’ Hispanics
What Trump’s Phoenix rally taught us
In a statement announcing the pardon, his first, Mr. Trump said: “Arpaio’s life and career, which began at the age of 18 when he enlisted in the military after the outbreak of the Korean War, exemplify selfless public service.
Sheriff Joe Arpaio attending a rally by Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump in Prescott Valley, Arizona (04 October 2016)Image copyright AFP
Image caption
Mr. Arpaio, 85, has hinted that he may stand again for public office following his pardon